Saturday, 30 January 2010

Ready for CAE p 80. Vocabulary

Inebriated: /ɪ ˈniːb rieɪt ɪd/ drunk.
Get stuck: be unable to move further
Reputed (to be sth / to have done sth): generally thought to be sth or to have done sth, although this is not certain. SYN rumoured: e.g. He is reputed to be the best heart surgeon in the country.
Get left: to be left stranded. To miss an opportunity, objective, etc
E.g. I don’t like to get left in a room alone. Don’t get left behind. Study English!

Ready for CAE p 79. Sleep. Extra Speaking

Ready for CAE Ss p 79. Sleep. Extra Speaking

Ready for CAE p 79. Sleep. Extra Vocabulay

Ready for CAE Ss p 79. Sleep. Extra Vocabulary

Ready for CAE p 79. I Dreamed A Dream - Susan Boyle. Extra Song

Ready for CAE p 79. The Cranberries: Dreams. Extra Song

Ready for CAE p 78. My Constant Fight to Stay Awake. Vocabulary

MY CONSTANT FIGHT TO STAY AWAKE
Narcolepsy: a condition in which sby falls into a deep sleep when they are in relaxing surroundings.
To nod off: (informal) to fall asleep for a short time while you are sitting in a chair.
To service: [usually passive] to examine a vehicle or machine and repair it if necessary so that it continues to work correctly.
To snooze: (informal) to have a short light sleep, especially during the day and usually not in bed.
The sack: (BrE, informal) being told by your employer that you can no longer continue working for a company, etc., usually because of sthg that you have done wrong.
However tired: Por muy cansado…
To baffle: to confuse sby completely; to be too difficult or strange for sby to understand or explain.
Blind: a covering for a window, especially one made of a roll of cloth that is fixed at the top of the window and can be pulled up and down.
To draw a blind: to open or close curtains, etc.
Bouncer: a person employed to stand at the entrance to a club, pub, etc. to stop people who are not wanted from going in, and to throw out people who are causing trouble inside.
Inebriated: drunk.
Arousal: excitement.
To slump: to sit or fall down heavily.
To drop: to fall or make sthg fall deliberately.
Surge: a sudden increase of a strong feeling.
To hold: to support the weight of sby/sthg.
Buckle: to crush or bend sth
To be taken aback: [usually passive] to shock or surprise sby very much
High-pitched: (of sounds) very high.
Squeal: a long high cry or sound.
To snap out of: to help sby to stop feeling unhappy.
To come round: to become conscious again.
Fresh-faced: having a young, healthy-looking face.
Overwhelming: very great or very strong; so powerful that you cannot resist it or decide how to react.
To put sthg down to: to attribute, to consider that sthg is caused by sthg.
Tablet: (especially BrE) a small round solid piece of medicine that you swallow.
Condition: the state of sby’s health or how fit they are. an illness or a medical problem that you have for a long time because it is not possible to cure it.
Mood: the way you are feeling at a particular time.
To level out: to stay at a steady level of development or progress after a period of sharp rises or falls.
Tiny: very small in size or amount.
To take sby / sthg for granted: to be so used to sby/sthg that you do not recognise their true value any more and do not show that you are grateful.
To encounter: to experience sthg, especially sthg unpleasant or difficult, while you are trying to do sthg else.
Rejection: refusal to accept sthg or sby.
To turn up: to appear.
Forlorn: appearing lonely and unhappy.
To turn down: to reject or refuse to consider an offer, a proposal, etc. or the person who makes it.
Happy-go-lucky: not caring or worrying about the future.
To crack a joke: to tell a joke.
To set off: to start a process or series of events.
To look on the bright side: to be cheerful or positive about a bad situation, for example by thinking only of the advantages and not the disadvantages.
To grin: to smile.

Ready for CAE p 77. Idioms with "Mind". Extra Speaking

Ready for CAE Ss p 77. Idioms With Mind. Extra Speaking

Vocabulary Exercise:

Match the following idioms with the definitions 1 to 10.


- To speak your mind

- To cross your mind

- To mind your own business

- To be in two minds about something

- To be bored out of your mind

- To make your mind up

- To change your mind

- Out of sight, out of mind

- To give sby a piece of your mind

- To bear / to keep in mind



1. To decide.

2. To be extremely bored.

3. To remember a piece of information when you are making a decision or thinking about a matter.

4. To say what you think about something very directly.

5. To form a new opinion or make a new decision about something which is different from your old one.

6. To think of something.

7. To be unable to decide about something.

8. To speak angrily to someone about something they have done wrong.

9. Said to emphasize that when something or someone cannot be seen, it is easy to forget them.

10. Used to tell someone in a rude way that you do not want them to ask about something private.



KEY

- To speak your mind: 4.

- To cross your mind: 6.

- To mind your own business: 10.

- To be in two minds about something: 7.

- To be bored out of your mind: 2.

- To make your mind up: 1.

- To change your mind: 5.

- Out of sight, out of mind: 9.

- To give sby a piece of your mind: 8. E.g. I've had enough from John. I'm going to give him a piece of my mind. Sally, stop it, or I'll give you a piece of my mind.

- To bear / to keep in mind: 3.

Finally, you can also listen to the song If You Could Read My Mind by Gordon Lightfoot and fill in the gaps.

Ready for CAE p 77. Extra Speaking

Ready for CAE Ss p 77.Extra Speaking

Ready for CAE p 76. BAFTAS 2012. Extra Listening.



Watch the video and fill in the gaps with a word or phrase.
1. The star of Single Man, The King's Speech and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is a man so brilliant, so talented and so successful that we would have been _________________ by his presence with us. However, it ______________  we do live in an ideal world because _______________, the Colin they call Firth!
2. "Actress in a leading role" is a category in which Colin Firth has been _________________________.
3. Viola Davis: "Just 24 years old, he _____________ the best part of a person's life. Anniversary of his death comes every year and I can't breathe. But to you all, it's just another day at Bridge"
4. Meryl Streep: "Perhaps the Right Honourable gentleman could attend more closely to what I'm saying, rather than how I am saying it. He may receive a valuable education________________ himself"
5. Meryl Streep: "the ________ of the well-known is to be misunderstood. And the ambition of this film, The Iron Lady, was to look at the life of the Iron Lady from the inside out and to locate something real, maybe hidden, but _____________ in the life of someone that we've all decided we all know everything about already."
6. Meryl Streep: " I owe so much to Phyllida Lloyd, Abi Morgan, Pathe, Damien Jones for _____________ this, for asking and expecting so much of me. I want to thank the _____________ Jim Broadbent, the __________________ Olivia Colman, my beloved moths, all 300 beautiful actors and crew that worked on this film
7. Prince Charming tried the ___________ on and it fitted.
8. A true Hollywood superstar is standing back there ____________ the BAFTA mask and golden envelope makes me all ____________, if I say Vanilla Sky, Volver and Pirates of the Caribbean, you will know who I mean. In fact she's so popular, they've even named a type of very popular beach, __________ and common leisure activity after her. The great Penelope Cruz.

KEY
1. bowled over (bowl somebody over: to surprise or impress somebody a lot) turns out, behold (to look at or see somebody/something).
2. grievously overlooked (grievous: very serious and often causing great pain or suffering) (overlook: to fail to see or notice something. Miss. E.g. In my hurry to finish the exam I had overlooked part of one of the questions.)
3. skipped
4.  in spite of
5. fate (the things, especially bad things, that will happen or have happened to somebody/something) truthful (saying only what is true, honest)
6. sticking with (stick with sth: to continue with something or continue doing something. E.g. They decided to stick with their original plan.) soulful (expressing or appearing to express deep and often sorrowful feeling) divinely gifted
7. slipper (a loose soft shoe that you wear in the house) 
8. clutching. (Clutch: to hold somebody/something tightly.) flattery (praise. Halagos) heath (a large area of open land that is not used for farming and is covered with rough grass and other small wild plants)

Transcript
Stephen Fry: Well, women who act for understandable reasons prefer usually to be called actors, not actresses. That is until it is awards time and they are prepared to make an exception and be nominated into the category "Best Actress". And that's the category we've now arrived at. In an ideal world, to present the award, I would have been able to introduce last year's winner of best actor. You know the star of Single Man, The King's Speech and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, a man so brilliant, so talented and so successful that we would have been bowled over by his presence with us. But ladies and gentlemen, it turns out  we do live in an ideal world because behold, the Colin they call Firth!
Colin Firth: Good evening! It's my great privilege to present a category in which I have been grievously overlooked- "Actress in a leading role". Let's have a look at the nominees.

Viola Davis- The Help
"Just 24 years old, he skipped the best part of a person's life. Anniversary of his death comes every year and I can't breathe. But to you all, it's just another day at Bridge"

Meryl Streep- The Iron Lady
"Perhaps the Right Honourable gentleman could attend more closely to what I'm saying, rather than how I am saying it. He may receive a valuable education in spite of himself"

Colin Firth: And the BAFTA goes to Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep: I'll get there! I'll get there! Oh my God. Thank you so much. That couldn't be worse, that couldn't have gone worse! Oh, gosh. Somebody once said, I think it was Margaret Atwood, actually I always say it was Atwood but I don't even know if she said this, but somebody once said, "the fate of the well-known is to be misunderstood. And the ambition of this film, The Iron Lady, was to look at the life of the Iron Lady from the inside out and to locate something real, maybe hidden, but truthful in the life of someone that we've all decided we all know everything about already. And I'm very proud of the film and I owe so much to Phyllida Lloyd, Abi Morgan, Pathe, Damien Jones for sticking with this, for asking and expecting so much of me. I want to thank the soulful Jim Broadbent, the divinely gifted Olivia Colman, my beloved moths, all 300 beautiful actors and crew that worked on this film and to say that half of me is Streep, but the other half is Wilkinson from Lincolnshire so I come by it honestly, this part. Thank you very very much I’m so grateful. I’m so grateful, thank you.
Stephen Fry: Oh Prince Charming tried the slipper on and it fitted Cinderella at once. What a happy ending! It follows as the night, the Dame that if there is to be an award for Best Actress, there should also be one for Best Actor. To remind us of the nominees and announce the chosen one, a true Hollywood superstar. Just knowing she's standing back there clutching the BAFTA mask and golden envelope makes me all flattery, if I say Vanilla Sky, Volver and Pirates of the Caribbean, you will know who I mean. In fact she's so popular, they've even named a type of very popular beach, heath and common leisure activity after her. The great Penelope Cruz.

Ready for CAE p 76. Reviews. Vocabulary



Reviews. Vocabulary
Useful language for reviews


Positive Adjectives

Most of us like to discuss movies and shows that we have seen and books that we have read. This post provides you with a range of adjectives and phrases for describing what you have seen and read in a way that is precise and varied.
We often want to say that we found a movie or a book enjoyable. Two very useful ‘-able’ adjectives here are readable and watchable. Books that are readable are easy and enjoyable to read (sometimes despite being about subjects that might seem difficult or boring): It’s a very readable account of the history of this great city.
Movies and shows that are watchable give you pleasure when you watch them: It’s probably not his best movie but it’s very watchable. An adjective with a similar meaning is entertaining: It’s not a great novel but it’s fairly entertaining.
Meanwhile, a book that is very enjoyable may be described as a good read: I’d really recommend his latest novel – it’s a good read.
A number of adjectives describe movies and books that are very interesting. Absorbing is used for a movie or book that is so interesting, it completely holds your attention: I really liked her last novel – I found it very absorbing.
Engrossing means the same, but is stronger: The movie was completely engrossing from start to finish.
A movie or book that is intriguing, meanwhile, is very interesting in a way that is unusual or mysterious: I found the storyline so intriguing – I had absolutely no idea what was going to happen next.
Other adjectives and phrases describe books and movies that are very exciting: Gripping is one such adjective and riveting another:
This is a series with great characters and a gripping storyline.
You’ll love the novel – it’s riveting stuff.
Compulsive is used to describe movies and books that are so exciting, you cannot stop watching or reading them. The adjective is often used in the phrases (for movies, shows, etc) compulsive viewing and (for books) compulsive reading:
His latest book is compulsive reading.
I find hospital documentaries like these compulsive viewing.
The adjective compelling means the same: I found the whole series very compelling.
Meanwhile, a book that is (informal) unputdownable is so exciting, you cannot stop reading it (you cannot ‘put it down’): His last novel was totally unputdownable. I read it over two days.
We hope that you read something unputdownable or watch something riveting this week!

It is hands down (easily and without any doubt) the best movie this year.

Action-packed: full of exciting events and activity: e.g. an action-packed weekend.
Atmospheric: creating an exciting or emotional mood: e.g. atmospheric music
Compelling: that makes you pay attention to it because it is so interesting and exciting: e.g. Her latest book makes compelling reading. A compelling film. She gives a compelling/memorable performance as a village doctor.
Convincing: The acting is very convincing
Enthusiastic and vivid descriptions of the scenery
It's an excellent read. It is both entertaining and educational.
Exhilarating
: /ɪɡˈzɪləreɪtɪŋ/ very exciting and enjoyable. Sp. Emocionante: e.g. My first parachute jump was an exhilarating experience.
Provides a fascinating/valuable/revealing insight into: e.g. the novel provides a fascinating insight (understanding,vision) into the customs in Mexico.
Gripping: exciting or interesting in a way that keeps your attention. Sp. Emocionante, fascinante, absorbente.


mesmerizing: /ˈmezməraɪzɪŋ/ having such a strong effect on you that you cannot give your attention to anything else. E.g. Her performance was mesmerizing.
   
Impressive: making you feel admiration, because they are very large, good, skilful, etc. Sp. Impresionante, imponente, excelente:an impressive performance. One of the most impressive novels of recent years She was very impressive in the interview.
Moving: causing you to have deep feelings of sadness or sympathy. Sp. Conmovedor: e.g. a deeply moving experience.
Outstanding: extremely good; excellent. E.g. Outstanding performance.
Powerful: effective. E.g. Powerful acting
Stunning: impressive: gave a stunning performance.

mesmerizing: /ˈmezməraɪzɪŋ/ having such a strong effect on you that you cannot give your attention to anything else. E.g. Her performance was mesmerizing.
Credible

Entertaining
Fast-moving
Innovative
Memorable

Unputdownable: (of a book) so exciting or interesting that you cannot stop reading it.

capture someone's imagination (or attention): fascinate someone.E.g. the project has captured the imagination of the local public. Not wonder the film has captured the imagination of audiences all over the world.

enlightening: /ɪnˈlaɪtnɪŋ/ giving information so that you can understand something better. It was a very enlightening movie. 

inspiring: exciting and encouraging you to do or feel something. E.g. an inspiring teacher. The book is less than inspiring.

Negative adjectives
Clichéd:/ˈkliːʃeɪd/ used so often that it no longer has much meaning and is not interesting: e.g. a clichéd view of upper-class life.
Excruciating:/ɪkˈskruːʃieɪtɪŋ/ extremely painful or bad.E.g. There are two versions of this excruciating film. Excruciatingly (adv): e.g. excruciatingly boring.
Implausible: Not seeming reasonable or probable; failing to convince; not believable. Sp. Inverosímil. E.g. A rather implausible story.
Overhyped: promoted or publicized to excess exaggerating its good qualities, in order to get a lot of public attention for it: Promoters grossly overhyped the movie.
Sentimental: producing emotions such as pity, romantic love or sadness, which may be too strong or not appropriate; feeling these emotions too much. Sp. Sensiblero: a slushy, sentimental love story
Slushy: stories, films / movies or feelings that are considered to be silly and without value because they are too emotional and romantic. Corny. Sp. Sensiblero: e.g. slushy romantic fiction.

cheesy:  
1. not very good or original, and without style, in a way that is embarrassing but amusing. E.g. a cheesy horror movie. That’s the cheesiest chat-up line I’ve ever heard.
2. too emotional or romantic, in a way that is embarrassing. E.g. a cheesy love song a cheesy romance novel.
drippy: boring, stupid and weak or sentimental. E.g. her drippy boyfriend. A drippy love song.
  
Tedious: lasting or taking too long and not interesting. Boring. E.g. A very long and tedious film.
Unconvincing: not seeming true or real; not making you believe that sth is true: e.g.
I find the characters in the book very unconvincing.
I found the plot rather predictable/disappointing.

Expressions to compare and contrast
Bear a close/a striking/a strong/a slight/little/no resemblance to: e.g. Her latest novel, a tale of unrequited love, bears little resemblance to her earlier, more philosophical work.
There is little to choose between (hardly any difference between) the two CDs in terms of quality of production.
The plot of the novel develops along very different lines from that of the film.
There are several obvious/striking similarities between the two films.
There is a world of difference between the two records, despite their shared flamenco influences.
What sets the film apart from others of the same genre is its ability to make us laugh.
A considerable/huge/marked/slight difference
A close/remarkable/striking/ similarity
Be dissimilar from/to: E.g. Dissimilar from other New York films.
Be very much alike
Be unlike another film

Differ from
One thing compares (un)favourably/ well/badly with another
Develop in a different way from
Have a great deal/little/nothing in common with
Resemble each other


Other expressions
I would highly recommend it to anyone who is interested in the human mind.
One particular strength/ weakness of the film is
The design/production is second to none (the best).
The characterization is not its best feature.
I would strongly advise you (not) to go out and buy/see it.
Do not be put off (to make sb lose interest in or enthusiasm for sth. Sp. Desanimar)by the title/critics/cover.
It will have you roaring with laughter (laugh very loudly).
I would definitely give it a miss (decide not to do sth.)


in the nick of time: at the very last moment; just in time before something bad happens. E.g. They escaped from the smoke-filled house just in the nick of time. An unprecedented catastrophe had been avoided just in the nick of time.

A blockbuster /ˈblɒkbʌstə(r)/ something very successful, especially a very successful book or film/movie. E.g. a Hollywood blockbuster.

An art film: (also art house film) is typically a serious, independent film not aimed at a mass market audience. An art film is intended to be a serious artistic work, often experimental and not designed for mass appeal.


art house: a movie theater that specializes in films that are artistic or experimental rather than merely entertaining.

Sample sentences
The real-life struggle (a hard fight in which people try to obtain or achieve sth, especially sth that sb else does not want them to have. Sp. Lucha) of brilliant minds with schizophrenia /ˌskɪtsəʊˈfriːniə/ and Alzheimer's /ˈæltshaɪməz/ disease may not sound like the ingredients of an entertaining afternoon's viewing.
Russell Crowe's stunning performance as mathematical genius John Nash and Judi Dench's moving portrayal of novelist Iris Murdoch will have you rushing out to buy the books on which these two films are based.
It is in their thematic content that the two films resemble each other most. Both focus on the withdrawal (the act of moving or taking sth away or back. Sp. Retirada) of the protagonists into their own inner world and the effect this has on their long-suffering but devoted marital partners. Also common to both films is the fact that we witness the two academics in their youth and old age. Hats off here to Crowe's make up team- he is remarkably convincing as the sixty-six-year-old Nash receiving his Nobel Prize.
Iris differs from A Beautiful Mind in this respect, relying instead on other actors to play the vivacious (having a lively, attractive personality) young Iris - a very credible Kate Winslet- and her stuttering (having difficulty speaking because he cannot stop himself from repeating the first sound of some words several times; stammering) companion. In addition, unlike the more linear American film, flashbacks are used to good effect to switch (change from one thing to another) backwards and forwards between the two contrasting stages of Murdoch's life.
The strength of Iris lies in its powerful acting and mundane (ordinary) realism, with the novelist seen in her cluttered (full of a lot of things and untidy) Oxford house. However, if, as I do, you favour something more visually appealing, but no less plausible, then A Beautiful Mind is a definite must-see.


Sample answer 2:
"Now, in the last 12 months the world of music has lost some incredible talent."
"Words like 'icon', 'pioneer' and 'innovator' are often overused, but not when it comes to one man who tragically left us last month. Tonight the Brits honour the remarkable David Bowie. Please welcome Annie Lennox." 
"On the 10th of January this year, the world was stunned and shaken by the news that David Bowie had suddenly passed away.

I suspect that everyone is still trying to process this sadly unexpected event...

Even if they didn't know him personally - many people must feel as if things will never be quite the same again.

He had that special kind of significance.

For me, it's almost impossible to mention Bowie's name in the past tense.

Everything he represented as an artist was and always will be - vital and incredibly present.

As a cutting edge artistic genius, he continues to live on through his music.

David Bowie is deeply embedded in the heart of British culture, as a fixture within our collective inner psyche, influencing every decade from the moment he first appeared on the airwaves with "Space Oddity" in 1969, right up to the present day.

Like the miraculous moon landing that inspired the song, he drew us away from our suburban lives, expanding our horizons - turning everything on its head into gloriously subversive technicolour.

As an innovative writer, performer and Rock star... there was no one and nothing else like him. He was truly unique.

A quintessential visionary, pushing the limits of his shape-shifting persona.

The ultimate iconoclast - gracious, dangerous and legendary…..

The legacy of his extraordinary sound and vision will be loved and revered for as long as the earth still spins.

The BRITs Icon Award is only presented to unparalleled artists - whose writing, recording and performance set them apart as having made a lasting impact on the nation’s culture, recognising the very highest level of British music achievement." 


To accept the award, I'd now like to invite David's dear friend Gary Oldman to the stage.

Thank you. We are all coming to terms with the magnitude of David's passing. The Jones family lost a husband and a father, those closest to David lost a dear friend and the world lost a man and artist of transcendent talent.
As Annie so gracefully said, David's contribution, his influence on popular music, on culture itself, has no equal. He was the very definition, the living embodiment of that singular word "icon" and I am so deeply touched and honoured to be here tonight to accept this award for David and his family. In recent years, David sparingly spoke about music and his process, but in one of these rare instances, he graciously and eloquently expounded,  "Music has given me over 40 years of extraordinary experiences. I can't say that life's pains or more tragic episodes have been diminished because of it, but it has allowed me so many moments of companionship when I have been lonely and a sublime means of communication when I have wanted to touch people. It has been both my doorway of perception and the house that I live in. Over his career, David challenged and changed our understanding of the medium. Whether in music or in life, he emphasised originality, experimentation, exploration, and in his very unique way, he also reminded us to never take ourselves too seriously.
David was funny, hilariously so. And the laughs were many and massive. And I shall miss them.
A related story. A few years ago we were standing on a street corner. And he was approached by this big fellow, rocker type, long hair, you know, leather clad, and he offered up this piece of paper for David's autograph. David signed the piece of paper, and as the fella walked away, he turned to me, and said, "He's gonna be disappointed." I said, "Why?" He said, "Cos I just signed it 'Gary Oldman'". His outlook was always positive and I never once heard him complain. 
I can share with you that David faced his illness with enormous courage, dignity, grace and customary humour. Even in dire circumstances. When he wrote to tell me the bad news that he had cancer, he added 'the good news is I've got my cheekbones back'. He was the sweetest soul ever, with the best cheekbones, until it was done. David, you were mortal but your potential was superhuman and your remarkable music is living on. We love you and we thank you.   
Watch video here 

Read more:
http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/topic/describing_a_story 
https://dictionaryblog.cambridge.org/2016/09/21/its-very-entertaining-words-for-describing-movies-and-books/

Ready for CAE p 76. Stephen Fry Pays Tribute to the Harry Potter Films. Extra Listening.



British actor Stephen Fry, the narrator of the British audiobook versions of the Harry Potter series, pays tribute to the Harry Potter films which receive an award for Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema.

Director David Heyman pays tribute to the 6,000 people who have worked on each of the Potter films:

"Over the past decade we've had the privilege of working with some of the finest people working today, in an atmosphere filled with pride but no ego, working on glorious fiction created by Jo Rowling.

"We became a family of sorts, we had an awful lot of fun."

Harry Potter author JK Rowling is equally enthused: "It's very strange to look back after seven films and remember how wary I was of letting anyone put Harry on the screen.

"I kept saying no and it was David Heyman who persuaded me.

"Being involved in these films has been one of the best experiences of my life," she adds.

Ready for CAE Ss p 76. Stephen Fry. Harry Potter's Bafta. Extra Listening

Ready for CAE p 76. A Conversation with Amy Tan. Extra Listening



A CONVERSATION WITH AMY TAN
 0) According to Amy Tan, a book is like windows or doors to your mind which you can get out of to explore the world.
  1. Some elements constitute a good place to start a story: ________________, ________________, ________________, ________________.
  2. When you read a book, you go through the same feelings, _____________________, _____________________, as the characters.
  3. Amy Tan’s parents thought that learning Mandarin would affect _____________________ to learn English.
  4. Her mother and her friends used to sit around the kitchen table and talk about the _____________________.
  5. At around the age of 8, she used to read Thesaurus and felt each of the words in the book were like _____________________ to her.
  6. Her mother’s many warnings made her grow up with a _____________________.
  7. Amy Tan’s grandmother had been the daughter of a _____________________.
  8. When her great-grandfather died, Amy’s grandmother and her mother were left _____________________, and felt very ashamed.
  9. Her mother’s warnings were her way to say she _____________________.
  10. Amy Tan started making up things when she _____________________ to her friends when she moved from one place to the other.
KEY
  1. Some elements constitute a good place to start a story: CONFUSION, CONFLICTS, AMBIGUITIES, AMBIVALENCE.
  2. When you read a book, you go through the same feelings, JOY, TRAGEDY, LOSS, as the characters.
  3. Amy Tan’s parents thought that learning Mandarin would affect HER ABILITY to learn English.
  4. Her mother and her friends used to sit around the kitchen table and talk about the OLD DAYS.
  5. At around the age of 8, she used to read Thesaurus and felt each of the words in the book were like LITTLE STORIES to her.
  6. Her mother’s many warnings made her grow up with a SENSE OF DANGER.
  7. Amy Tan’s grandmother had been the daughter of a SCHOLAR.
  8. When her great-grandfather died, Amy’s grandmother and her mother were left DESTITUTE and felt very ashamed.
  9. Her mother’s warnings were her way to say she LOVED HER.
  10. Amy Tan started making up things when she WROTE LETTERS to her friends when she moved from one place to the other.